Register Now: 2020 Annual Conference

Join us for the TAMEST 2020 Annual Conference: Innovating Texas, January 7-9, 2020, at the Fairmont Dallas hotel. This event will explore how basic research leads to new technologies, products and companies and showcase avenues to commercialization for researchers across an array of disciplines.

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TAMEST Board with North Texas University Leadership

TAMEST 2020 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Awards

Changing the future of Alzheimer’s Disease. Utilizing crystals to produce drugs for kidney stones and malaria. Understanding previously unobserved functions of our universe. And pioneering the evolution of wound care. These are the discoveries by Texas’ rising stars in research being honored with the 2020 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Awards by TAMEST.

Learn more about the 2020 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Awards recipients >

TAMEST Board with North Texas University Leadership

TAMEST Welcomes 16 New Members in 2019

From Nobel Laureates to world-renowned experts, TAMEST has welcomed more than 300 members since our organization’s inception in 2004. This year, TAMEST is pleased to welcome 16 new members who have been elected to the National Academies or recruited to Texas.

Meet TAMEST’s 2019 New Members >

TAMEST Board with North Texas University Leadership

Profile: Eric Olson, Ph.D. (NAM, NAS)

Dr. Eric Olson is a man of many talents. The professor and chair of the Department of Molecular Biology at UT Southwestern Medical Center is equal parts award-winning molecular biologist, rock band front man and family man mountaineer.

We connected with Dr. Olson ahead of the TAMEST 2020 Annual Conference: Innovating Texas, where he will be a speaker, to find out more about his work and passion for innovation.

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John Goodenough

Nobel Prize in Chemistry Goes to TAMEST’s John Goodenough of The University of Texas at Austin

AUSTIN, Texas—John B. Goodenough, professor in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and member of TAMEST (The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas), has been awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in chemistry—jointly with Stanley Whittingham of the State University of New York at Binghamton and Akira Yoshino of Meijo University—“for the development of lithium-ion batteries.”

In the words of the Nobel Foundation, “Through their work, they have created the right conditions for a wireless and fossil fuel-free society, and so brought the greatest benefit to humankind.”

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