Emily CarterKEYNOTE: Emily Carter, Ph.D. (NAS)
Founding Director, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment; Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment; Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering & Applied and Computational Mathematics | Princeton University

Professor Carter is the Founding Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment at Princeton University. Her current research is focused entirely on enabling discovery and design of materials for sustainable energy. She received her B.S. in Chemistry from UC Berkeley in 1982 and her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Caltech in 1987. After a year as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Colorado, Boulder, she spent the next 16 years on the faculty of UCLA as a Professor of Chemistry and later also of Materials Science and Engineering. She moved to Princeton University in 2004. The author of over 310 publications, she has delivered over 480 invited and plenary lectures all over the world and serves on numerous advisory boards spanning a wide range of disciplines. Her scholarly work has been recognized by national and international awards from a variety of entities, including the American Chemical Society, the American Vacuum Society, the American Physical Society, the Institute of Physics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science. Professor Carter was elected in 2008 to both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.


Jim ChelikowskyJim Chelikowsky, Ph.D.
W.A. “Tex” Moncrief, Jr., Chair of Computational Materials; Professor in the Departments of Physics, Chemical Engineering, and Chemistry and Biochemistry; Director, Center for Computational Materials, Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences | The University of Texas at Austin

Jim Chelikowsky his BS from Kansas State University and his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley, both in physics. He is currently the W.A. "Tex" Moncrief, Jr. Chair of Computational Materials and a professor in the Departments of Physics, Chemical Engineering, and Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to his arrival at Texas he was a postdoc at Bell Laboratories, a group head at Exxon Research and Engineering Corporate Research Science Laboratories, and a professor at the University of Minnesota within the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science.

He has received the David Turnbull Lectureship Award from the Materials Research Society, and the David Adler Lectureship Award along with the Aneesur Rahman Prize from the American Physical Society. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Materials Research Society. He also has received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship.

His research work centers on the optical properties of semiconductors, interfacial phenomena in solids, defects in electronic materials, pressure induced amorphization, nano-regime systems, the microstructure of liquids, simulating probe microscopies, and the development of high performance algorithms to predict properties of materials.


Joseph DeSimoneKEYNOTE: Joseph DeSimone, Ph.D. (NAE, NAM, NAS)
Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry; William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering | University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Joseph M. DeSimone is a prolific inventor, serial entrepreneur and eminent scholar. DeSimone is the Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University and of Chemistry at UNC. DeSimone is also an adjunct member at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Currently DeSimone is on leave from the university and has assumed the CEO role at Carbon3D in Silicon Valley. DeSimone has published over 300 scientific articles and has over 150 issued patents in his name with over 80 patents pending.

DeSimone is one of less than twenty individuals who have been elected to all three branches of the National Academies: Institute of Medicine (2014), National Academy of Sciences (2012) and the National Academy of Engineering (2005). He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2005). DeSimone has received over 50 major awards and recognitions including the 2015 Dickson Prize from Carnegie Mellon University; 2014 Industrial Research Institute Medal; 2014 Kathryn C. Hach Award for Entrepreneurial Success from the ACS; 2013 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors; 2012 Walston Chubb Award for Innovation by Sigma Xi; the 2010 AAAS Mentor Award in recognition of his efforts to advance diversity in the chemistry PhD workforce; the 2009 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award; the 2009 North Carolina Award; the 2008 $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize for Invention and Innovation; the 2007 Collaboration Success Award from the Council for Chemical Research; the 2005 ACS Award for Creative Invention; the 2002 John Scott Award presented by the City Trusts, Philadelphia, given to "the most deserving" men and women whose inventions have contributed in some outstanding way to the "comfort, welfare and happiness" of mankind; the 2002 Engineering Excellence Award by DuPont; and the 2002 Wallace H. Carothers Award from the Delaware Section of the ACS.

DeSimone, an innovative polymer chemist, has made breakthrough contributions in fluoropolymer synthesis, colloid science, nano-biomaterials, green chemistry and most recently 3D printing. DeSimone is the co-founder of several companies including Micell Technologies, Bioabsorbable Vascular Solutions, Liquidia Technologies and Carbon3D. DeSimone received his BS in Chemistry in 1986 from Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA and his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1990 from Virginia Tech.


Douglas FairchildDouglas P. Fairchild, Ph.D.
Sr. Metallurgical and Welding Consultant | ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.

Doug joined ExxonMobil in 1982. He holds BS, MS, and PhD degrees in Welding Engineering and Materials Science from The Ohio State University. His expertise includes physical and mechanical metallurgy, fracture mechanics, electron microscopy, and failure analysis. For a majority of his career, Doug has conducted research on advanced high strength steels and related fabrication technology. Doug’s work is accredited with the discovery of local brittle zones (LBZs). His research has applications to offshore structures, pipelines, pressure vessels, ships, and liquefied natural gas facilities. Doug has produced more than 60 publications and 10 patents.


Julia GreerKEYNOTE: Julia Greer, Ph.D.
Professor of Materials Science, Mechanics and Medical Engineering | California Institute of Technology

Greer’s research focuses on creating 3-dimensional nano-architectures and designing experiments to assess their properties. These architected meta-materials have multiple applications as biomedical devices, battery electrodes, and lightweight structural materials and provide a rich “playground” for fundamental science. Greer has S.B. in Chemical Engineering (minor in Advanced Music Performance) from MIT in 1997, Ph.D. in Materials Science from Stanford, worked at Intel (2000-03) and was a post-doc at PARC (2005-07). Julia joined Caltech in 2007 and has appointments in Materials Science, Mechanical Engineering, and Medical Engineering. Greer has over 100 publications; her work was recognized among Top 10 Breakthrough Technologies by MIT’s Technology Review (2015), she is a Young Global Leader by World Economic Forum (2014) and is a recipient of multiple awards: Kavli Early Career (2014), Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship (2013), Society of Engineering Science Young Investigator (2013), TMS Early Career Faculty (2013), NASA Early Career Faculty (2012), Popular Mechanics Breakthrough Award (2012), ASME Early Career (2011), DOE Early Career (2011), TMS’s Young Leaders (2010), DARPA’s Young Faculty (2009), Technology Review’s TR-35, (2008), and NSF’s CAREER (2007). Greer serves as an Associated Editor of Nano Letters and on the Board of Reviewing Editors for Science. She is also a concert pianist, with recent performances of “nanomechanics rap” with MUSE/IQUE, solo piano recitals and chamber concerts (2007-present), and as a soloist of Brahms Concerto No. 2 with Redwood Symphony (2006).


Nanshu LuNanshu Lu, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, and Department of Biomedical Engineering | The University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Lu received her Bachelor's degree from Tsinghua University in 2005 and Ph.D. from Harvard in 2009, both in Solid Mechanics. She then became a Beckman Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Illinois working on the mechanics and materials of flexible electronics before she joined UT Austin in fall 2011. Dr. Lu is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics and also holds a courtesy appointment in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. She is leading a multidisciplinary research group consisting of students and postdocs from Engineering Mechanics, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Biomedical Engineering, working on the mechanics and manufacture of bio-integrated electronics, both epidermal and in vivo, for the purpose of health monitoring, surgical instrumentation, human-machine interfaces, and so on. Her research has been published in high profile journals including Science, Nature Materials, Nature Nanotechnology, ACS Nano etc., and has been highlighted by news media such as Nature News, ScienceNOW, Technology Review, BBC, CNN, ABC News, Wall Street Journal and so on. Dr. Lu was named 35 innovators under 35 by MIT Technology Review in 2012 and is the recipient of 2014 NSF CAREER Award, 2015 AFOSR and ONR Young Investigator Awards.


Antonios MikosAntonios Mikos, Ph.D., (NAM, NAE)
Louis Calder Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Director of the Center for Excellence in Tissue Engineering | Rice University

Antonios G. Mikos is the Louis Calder Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice University. His research focuses on the synthesis, processing, and evaluation of new biomaterials for use as scaffolds for tissue engineering, as carriers for controlled drug delivery, and as non-viral vectors for gene therapy. His work has led to the development of novel orthopaedic, dental, cardiovascular, neurologic, and ophthalmologic biomaterials. Mikos is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, and the Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, the Biomedical Engineering Society, the Controlled Release Society, the International Union of Societies for Biomaterials Science and Engineering, the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society, and the National Academy of Inventors. He has been recognized by various awards including the Founders Award of the Society For Biomaterials, the Robert A. Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award of the Biomedical Engineering Society, and the Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Engineering of the Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas.


C. D. Mote, Jr.C. D. Mote, Jr.
President | National Academy of Engineering

C. D. Mote, Jr. is president of the National Academy of Engineering and Regents’ Professor on leave from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Dr. Mote is a native Californian who earned his BS, MS, and PhD degrees at the University of California, Berkeley in mechanical engineering between 1959 and 1963. After a postdoctoral year in England and three years as an assistant professor at the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, he returned to Berkeley to join the faculty in mechanical engineering for the next 31 years. He and his students investigated the dynamics, stability, and control of high-speed rotating and translating continua (e.g., disks, webs, tapes, and cables) as well as biomechanical problems associated with snow skiing. He coined the area called “dynamics of axially moving materials” encompassing these systems. Fifty-eight PhD students earned their degrees under his mentorship.

He held an endowed chair in mechanical systems at Berkeley and chaired the Mechanical Engineering Department from 1987 to 1991, when the National Research Council (NRC) ranked its graduate program effectiveness highest nationally. Because of his success at raising funds for mechanical engineering, in 1991 he was appointed vice chancellor expressly to create and lead a $1 billion capital campaign, which raised $1.4 billion.

In 1998 Dr. Mote was recruited to the presidency of the University of Maryland, College Park, a position he held until 2010 when he was appointed Regents’ Professor. His goal for the university was to elevate its self-expectation of achievement and its national and global position through proactive initiatives. During his tenure the number of Academy members on the faculty tripled, three Nobel laureates were recognized, and an accredited school of public health and a new department of bioengineering were created. He also founded a 130-acre research park next to the campus, faculty research funds increased by 150 percent, and partnerships with surrounding federal agencies and with international organizations expanded greatly. The number of students studying abroad tripled, and he created an annual open house day that attracts over 100,000 visitors, founded a charitable foundation for the campus whose board of trustees launched a successful $1 billion capital campaign, and took to lunch every student that wanted to go. The Academic Ranking of World Universities ranked the campus #36 in 2010 and its Engineering School #13.

The NAE elected him to membership in 1988 and to the positions of Councilor (2002–2008), Treasurer (2009–2013), and President for a six–year term beginning July 1, 2013. He has served on the NRC Governing Board Executive Committee since 2009. He chaired the NRC Committee on Global Science and Technology Strategies and Their Effects on US National Security (2009–2010), and co-chaired the National Academies Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable (2007–2013) and Committee on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Workforce Needs for the US Department of Defense and the US Industrial Base (2011–2012). He was vice chair of the NRC Committee on the Department of Defense Basic Research (2004) and served on the NRC committee that authored the Rising Above the Gathering Storm reports of 2005 and 2010. He was also a founding member of the FBI’s National Security Higher Education Advisory Board (2005–2010).

Dr. Mote’s recognitions include the NAE Founders Award, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Medal, and the Humboldt Prize of the Federal Republic of Germany. At the University of California, Berkeley, he was honored with the Distinguished Teaching Award, Distinguished Engineering Alumnus Award, Berkeley Citation, and Excellence in Achievement Award. He is an honorary fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Academy of Mechanics, Acoustical Society of America, and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He holds four honorary doctorates and two honorary professorships


Nicholas PeppasNicholas A. Peppas, Sc.D. (NAM, NAE)
Cockrell Family Regents Chair in Engineering No 6, Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering and Pharmaceutics; Director of Institute for Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, and Regenerative Medicine | The University of Texas at Austin

Nicholas A. Peppas is the Cockrell Family Regents Chair #6 in Engineering, with appointments in the Departments of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, and Director of the Institute of Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Regenerative Medicine. His work in biomaterials, polymer physics, drug delivery and bionanotechnology follows a multidisciplinary approach, blending modern molecular and cellular biology with engineering to design the next-generation of medical systems and devices for patient treatment. Named one of the One Hundred Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era. Member of NAE (2012 Founders Award), NAM, National Academy of Inventors, National Academy of France, Royal Academy of Spain, Academy of Athens. Recognized with awards from AIChE (Founders Award, William Walker Award, Institute Lecture, Jay Bailey Award, Bioengineering Award, Materials Award), BMES (Distinguished Scientist Award), AIMBE (Galletti Award), the Society for Biomaterials (Founders, Clemson and Hall Awards), the Controlled Release Society (Founders, Heller and Eurand Awards) etc. President of the International Union of Societies of Biomaterials Science and Engineering. Fellow AAAS, APS, ACS, MRS, SFB, AIMBE, BMES, AIChE, CRS, AAPS, ASEE. Peppas holds a Dipl. Eng. from the NTU of Athens (1971), a Sc.D. from MIT (1973), and honorary doctorates from the Universities of Ghent, Parma, Athens, Patras and Ljubljana.


Al Sacco, Jr.Al Sacco, Jr., Ph.D.
Dean, Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering | Texas Tech University

Al Sacco Jr. is dean of the Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering. Born in Boston MA, Sacco completed a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northeastern University in Boston, and a doctorate in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He flew as the payload specialist on the Space Shuttle Columbia on shuttle mission STS-73 in 1995. Dr. Sacco has more than 200 publications (including book chapters) in the areas of carbon filament initiation and growth, transition metal and acid catalyst and their deactivation, zeolite and zeo-type material synthesis, bio-sensor development and the development of quantum wires arrays and he has been the principal investigator on more than $24 million in research grants. Since joining Texas Tech in January 2011, he has raised over $152 million dollars with more than $22 million dollars being raised for the new Terry Fuller Petroleum Engineering Research Building, he has improved admission standards while seeing the college grow to more than 5,800 students (32% increase) and he has increased competitive research funding by more than 100%. His program to require international experience for all undergraduates is the first of its kind for a state school.


Samuel StuppKEYNOTE: Samuel Stupp, Ph.D. (NAE)
Board of Trustees Professor of Materials Science, Chemistry and Medicine | Northwestern University

Al Sacco Jr. is dean of the Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering. Born in Boston MA, Sacco completed a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Northeastern University in Boston, and a doctorate in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He flew as the payload specialist on the Space Shuttle Columbia on shuttle mission STS-73 in 1995. Dr. Sacco has more than 200 publications (including book chapters) in the areas of carbon filament initiation and growth, transition metal and acid catalyst and their deactivation, zeolite and zeo-type material synthesis, bio-sensor development and the development of quantum wires arrays and he has been the principal investigator on more than $24 million in research grants. Since joining Texas Tech in January 2011, he has raised over $152 million dollars with more than $22 million dollars being raised for the new Terry Fuller Petroleum Engineering Research Building, he has improved admission standards while seeing the college grow to more than 5,800 students (32% increase) and he has increased competitive research funding by more than 100%. His program to require international experience for all undergraduates is the first of its kind for a state school.